Posts Tagged ‘ Bush Tax Cuts ’

Obama’s Government Shutdown

A government shutdown occurs when a government discontinues providing services that are not considered “essential.” Typically, essential services include police, fire fighting, armed forces, utilities and corrections. Interestingly, Congress and the President are exempt from the furlough and continue to receive compensation despite the fact that other services are suspended.

Inconvenienced Citizens

  • Medicare: Some 400,000 newly eligible Medicare recipients were delayed in applying for the program.
  • Social Security: Claims from 112,000 new Social Security applicants were not processed. 212,000 new or replacement Social Security cards were not issued. 360,000 office visits were denied. 800,000 toll-free calls for information were not answered.
  • Healthcare: New patients were not accepted into clinical research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) clinical center. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ceased disease surveillance and hotline calls to NIH concerning diseases were not answered.
  • Environment: Toxic waste clean-up work at 609 sites stopped as 2,400 Superfund workers were sent home. Continue reading
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Obama State Of The Union 2011 (transcript)

Here is the full text of the speech draft, obtained by National Journal: from a Democratic insider who who declined to be identified because the source would be violating the White House’s embargo:

Tonight I want to begin by congratulating the men and women of the 112th Congress, as well as your new Speaker, John Boehner. And as we mark this occasion, we are also mindful of the empty chair in this Chamber, and pray for the health of our colleague – and our friend – Gabby Giffords.

It’s no secret that those of us here tonight have had our differences over the last two years. The debates have been contentious; we have fought fiercely for our beliefs. And that’s a good thing. That’s what a robust democracy demands. That’s what helps set us apart as a nation.

But there’s a reason the tragedy in Tucson gave us pause. Amid all the noise and passions and rancor of our public debate, Tucson reminded us that no matter who we are or where we come from, each of us is a part of something greater – something more consequential than party or political preference.

We are part of the American family. We believe that in a country where every race and faith and point of view can be found, we are still bound together as one people; that we share common hopes and a common creed; that the dreams of a little girl in Tucson are not so different than those of our own children, and that they all deserve the chance to be fulfilled.

That, too, is what sets us apart as a nation.

Now, by itself, this simple recognition won’t usher in a new era of cooperation. What comes of this moment is up to us. What comes of this moment will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight, but whether we can work together tomorrow.

I believe we can. I believe we must. That’s what the people who sent us here expect of us. With their votes, they’ve determined that governing will now be a shared responsibility between parties. New laws will only pass with support from Democrats and Republicans. We will move forward together, or not at all – for the challenges we face are bigger than party, and bigger than politics.

At stake right now is not who wins the next election – after all, we just had an election. At stake is whether new jobs and industries take root in this country, or somewhere else. It’s whether the hard work and industry of our people is rewarded. It’s whether we sustain the leadership that has made America not just a place on a map, but a light to the world.

We are poised for progress. Two years after the worst recession most of us have ever known, the stock market has come roaring back. Corporate profits are up. The economy is growing again.

But we have never measured progress by these yardsticks alone. We measure progress by the success of our people. By the jobs they can find and the quality of life those jobs offer. By the prospects of a small business owner who dreams of turning a good idea into a thriving enterprise. By the opportunities for a better life that we pass on to our children.

That’s the project the American people want us to work on. Together.

We did that in December. Thanks to the tax cuts we passed, Americans’ paychecks are a little bigger today. Every business can write off the full cost of the new investments they make this year. These steps, taken by Democrats and Republicans, will grow the economy and add to the more than one million private sector jobs created last year.

But we have more work to do. The steps we’ve taken over the last two years may have broken the back of this recession – but to win the future, we’ll need to take on challenges that have been decades in the making.

Many people watching tonight can probably remember a time when finding a good job meant showing up at a nearby factory or a business downtown. You didn’t always need a degree, and your competition was pretty much limited to your neighbors. If you worked hard, chances are you’d have a job for life, with a decent paycheck, good benefits, and the occasional promotion. Maybe you’d even have the pride of seeing your kids work at the same company.

That world has changed. And for many, the change has been painful.  I’ve seen it in the shuttered windows of once booming factories, and the vacant storefronts of once busy Main Streets. I’ve heard it in the frustrations of Americans who’ve seen their paychecks dwindle or their jobs disappear – proud men and women who feel like the rules have been changed in the middle of the game.

They’re right. The rules have changed. In a single generation, revolutions in technology have transformed the way we live, work and do business. Steel mills that once needed 1,000 workers can now do the same work with 100.  Today, just about any company can set up shop, hire workers, and sell their products wherever there’s an internet connection.

Meanwhile, nations like China and India realized that with some changes of their own, they could compete in this new world. And so they started educating their children earlier and longer, with greater emphasis on math and science. They’re investing in research and new technologies. Just recently, China became home to the world’s largest private solar research facility, and the world’s fastest computer.

So yes, the world has changed. The competition for jobs is real. But this shouldn’t discourage us. It should challenge us. Remember – for all the hits we’ve taken these last few years, for all the naysayers predicting our decline, America still has the largest, most prosperous economy in the world. No workers are more productive than ours. No country has more successful companies, or grants more patents to inventors and entrepreneurs. We are home to the world’s best colleges and universities, where more students come to study than any other place on Earth.
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The Day The Dollar Died


Dollar Losing Value Under Obama

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Dollar Losing Value Under Obama
Obama Bows To China’s President Hu Jintao
Obama Bowing To Japan’s Emperor Akihito
Obama Bowing To Saudi King
Tax Hikes in Obamacare
Obama’s Stimulus Package Has Failed To Deliver
Obama GM Bankruptcy
Obama Says ‘WE’RE OUT OF MONEY’
Where’s The Money !
Obama Golf Outings
Obama Signs $1.1 Trillion Spending Bill
Earmarks In The $1.1T Federal Spending Bill
The Bush Tax Cuts
Poverty In America Jumps To Record High Under Obama
Obama Attack Social Security
Obama’s Stimulus Package Has Failed To Deliver
Fed To Boost Economy By Buying $600B In Bonds
Rush Limbaugh: The Obamas Party Like Royalty
UNEMPLOYMENT JUMPS TO 9.6%Man On Knees Begging To Obama
Executive Order 13544, Socialized Health Care
Impeach Obama
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Tax Hikes in Obamacare

[PDF version]

Next week, the U.S. House of Representatives will be voting on an historic repeal of the Obamacare law.  While there are many reasons to oppose this flawed government health insurance law, it is important to remember that Obamacare is also one of the largest tax increases in American history.  Below is a comprehensive list of the two dozen new or higher taxes that pay for Obamcare’s expansion of government spending and interference between doctors and patients.

Individual Mandate Excise Tax(Jan 2014): Starting in 2014, anyone not buying “qualifying” health insurance must pay an income surtax according to the higher of the following

1 Adult 2 Adults 3+ Adults
2014 1% AGI/$95 1% AGI/$190 1% AGI/$285
2015 2% AGI/$325 2% AGI/$650 2% AGI/$975
2016 + 2.5% AGI/$695 2.5% AGI/$1390 2.5% AGI/$2085

Exemptions for religious objectors, undocumented immigrants, prisoners, those earning less than the poverty line, members of Indian tribes, and hardship cases (determined by HHS)

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2011 Omnibus Spending Bill (Summary)

Summary: Fiscal Year 2011 Consolidated Appropriations Bill

Washington, DC – The Senate Appropriations Committee released details of the FY 2011 Consolidated Appropriations Act, a substitute amendment to the House passed Continuing Resolution (H.R. 3082). The legislation is $29 billion below the cost of the budget proposed by the President and equal to the topline Budget Authority level of $1.108 trillion as proposed in the Sessions-McCaskill amendment.

The Omnibus, in contrast to a Continuing Resolution, lives up to Congress’ constitutional responsibility to provide federal agencies with the direction and the resources they require, most critically for national defense and homeland security. Below are a number of specific programs that would be impacted if forced to operate under a Continuing Resolution. A CR would fail to implement more than $10.2 billion in cuts made to wasteful, poor performing, or terminated military programs. In the Omnibus, these funds are redirected to high priority programs.

Head Start: The Omnibus includes an $840 million increase for Head Start, including increases to improve the quality and oversight of Head Start programs across the country. The CR includes an increase of only $314 million, putting over 60,000 disadvantaged children in limbo over whether they’ll receive comprehensive early childhood care next year.

Child Care: The omnibus includes a $681 million increase for child care for low-income families. The CR includes an increase of only $374 million, meaning about 45,000 fewer low-income children and their families would receive child care subsidies. These are families that are working, or in some cases looking for work, and that depend on these subsidies to do so. Continue reading

Obama Attack Social Security

Obama’s tax compromise not only gives a 700 billion dollar tax break to billionaires but has an even more dangerous aspect. It is the Trojan horse provision that threatens to destroy Social Security by undermining the longterm solvency of the social insurance system. Obama is proposing to knock 2 per cent off deductions that every worker regularly contributes to the Social Security Trust Fund. Social Security is funded by a 6.2 percent payroll tax on the first $106,800 earned by a worker. The tax is matched by employers. The package negotiated by Obama would reduce the tax paid by workers to 4.2 percent for 2011. Continue reading

The Bush Tax Cuts

The Bush tax cuts refers to two laws created and passed during the presidency of George W. Bush that generally lowered tax rates and revised the code specifying taxation in the United States. These were the:

The Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act of 2001 (Pub.L. 107-16, 115 Stat. 38, June 7, 2001), was a sweeping piece of tax legislation. It is commonly known by its abbreviation EGTRRA, often pronounced “egg-tra” or “egg-terra”, and sometimes also known simply as the 2001 act. The Act made significant changes in several areas of the US Internal Revenue Code, including income tax rates, estate and gift tax exclusions, and qualified and retirement plan rules. In general, the act lowered tax rates and simplified retirement and qualified plan rules such as for Individual retirement accounts, 401(k) plans, 403(b), and pension plans. Many of the tax reductions in EGTRRA were designed to be phased in over a period of up to 9 years.

One of the most notable characteristics of EGTRRA is that its provisions are designed to sunset, or revert to the provisions that were in effect before it was passed. EGTRRA will sunset on January 1, 2011 unless further legislation is enacted to make its changes permanent. The sunset provision sidesteps the Byrd Rule, a Senate rule that amends the Congressional Budget Act to allow Senators to block a piece of legislation if it purports to significantly increase the federal deficit beyond a ten-year term. In addition to the tax cuts implemented by the EGTRRA, it initiated a series of rebates for all taxpayers that filed a tax return for 2000. The rebate was up to a maximum of $300 for single filers with no dependents, $500 for single parents, and $600 for married couples. Continue reading