2011 Omnibus Spending Bill (Summary)

Summary: Fiscal Year 2011 Consolidated Appropriations Bill

Washington, DC – The Senate Appropriations Committee released details of the FY 2011 Consolidated Appropriations Act, a substitute amendment to the House passed Continuing Resolution (H.R. 3082). The legislation is $29 billion below the cost of the budget proposed by the President and equal to the topline Budget Authority level of $1.108 trillion as proposed in the Sessions-McCaskill amendment.

The Omnibus, in contrast to a Continuing Resolution, lives up to Congress’ constitutional responsibility to provide federal agencies with the direction and the resources they require, most critically for national defense and homeland security. Below are a number of specific programs that would be impacted if forced to operate under a Continuing Resolution. A CR would fail to implement more than $10.2 billion in cuts made to wasteful, poor performing, or terminated military programs. In the Omnibus, these funds are redirected to high priority programs.

Head Start: The Omnibus includes an $840 million increase for Head Start, including increases to improve the quality and oversight of Head Start programs across the country. The CR includes an increase of only $314 million, putting over 60,000 disadvantaged children in limbo over whether they’ll receive comprehensive early childhood care next year.

Child Care: The omnibus includes a $681 million increase for child care for low-income families. The CR includes an increase of only $374 million, meaning about 45,000 fewer low-income children and their families would receive child care subsidies. These are families that are working, or in some cases looking for work, and that depend on these subsidies to do so.

The Omnibus provides $12.8 million above the CR for this purpose, including up to 100 new Coast Guard maritime inspectors.

The Omnibus bill provides $219.6 million above the CR for TSA to acquire 800 explosives trace detection units, 275 additional canine teams, hire 31 additional intelligence officers, and strengthen international aviation security.

The bill provides $667.7 billion in new discretionary spending authority for the Department of Defense, including $157.8 billion for overseas contingency operations.

The bill provides sufficient funding to close the Pell Grant “shortfall” and prevent a cut to the $5,550 maximum award, and additional funding to improve mine safety.

The bill provides a total of $3.8 billion for State and Local Law Enforcement, which is $115.5 million above the enacted level and $345 million above the President’s budget request, for grants to aid local and state law enforcement and crime victims. From 2001 to 2006 these grant programs were cut by nearly $2 billion.

For Veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom and Iraq Freedom (OEF/OIF), $2.6 billion is provided, equal to the request, to meet the health care needs of veterans who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan, a $597 million increase over last year. The VA estimates that the number of OEF/OIF veterans in its health care system will reach 439,271 in 2011, a 68% increase since 2008. This funding includes research and treatment programs for mental health issues, including Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

The Omnibus provides $3.58 billion to fully fund 20,500 Border Patrol agents, of whom over 17,000 will be based on the Southwest Border – more than double the number of agents on board in 2004.

Nutrition: The bill provides a total of $95.506 billion, including mandatory funding, for domestic nutrition assistance.

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP): SNAP, formerly the Food Stamp Program, is funded at $70.907 billion in mandatory budget authority.

Child Nutrition: School Lunch and Breakfast programs are funded at $17.32 billion in mandatory budget authority.

The bill provides significant increases for the two premier federal agencies responsible for regulating safety and efficacy standards for our food and drug supply, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). FDA is funded at $2.541 billion, $37.433 million above the President’s request, and $195.426 million above fiscal year 2010 enacted level. FSIS is funded at $1.047 billion, $10 million above the President’s request, and $27 million above the fiscal year 2010 enacted level.

International food aid in the bill is comprised of two primary programs, the Food for Peace title II program and the McGovern-Dole Food for Education Program. Together, these programs are funded at $1.9 billion. Food for Peace Title II is funded at $1.69 billion, which is equal to the President’s request. The McGovern-Dole Food for Education Program is funded at $219.5 million, which is $10 million above the President’s request and fiscal year 2010 enacted level.

The bill also provides $5 million for the Foreign Agricultural Service to provide technical assistance in the establishment and growth of sustainable food production and marketing systems in developing countries.

The bill includes $2.811 billion for USDA research agencies. This is $43.9 million above the fiscal year 2010 enacted level, and $16.6 million above the President’s request. The primary agricultural research agencies, the Agricultural Research Service and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) receive $1.12 billion and $1.366 billion respectively. Within NIFA, the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative receives an increase of $26 million.

The bill includes $2.842 billion in discretionary budget authority for rural development programs, which is a decrease of $135 million from the fiscal year 2010 enacted level and an increase of $63 million above the President’s request. Generally, the bill provides level funding for rural development programs, including water and waste water, business programs, and electric and telecommunications loans and grants.

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC): WIC is funded at $6.852 billion in discretionary budget authority. There is also $125,000,000 in contingency funds which will be sufficient to meet current estimates of WIC caseload requirements.

Commodity Supplemental Food Program: The bill provides $181.788 million for the Commodity Supplemental Food Program, which includes $5 million to begin service in six additional States.

State and Local Law Enforcement – The agreement provides a total of $3.8 billion, which is $115.5 million above the enacted level and $345 million above the President’s budget request, for grants to aid local and state law enforcement and crime victims. From 2001 to 2006 these grant programs were cut by nearly $2 billion.

$519 million for Byrne Justice Assistance Grants (JAG), state formula grants to assist local law enforcement;

$542 million for Community Oriented Policing Service (COPS) programs, including $363 million for COPS Hiring grants to hire or retain roughly 1,500 police officers;

$506 million for juvenile justice and delinquency prevention;

$449 million to prevent violence against women; and

$363 million to prevent, investigate and prosecute crimes against children.

Bureau of Prisons (BOP) – BOP is provided $6.8 billion, which is $618 million above the enacted level and $20 million above the President’s request, to address rising costs, add staff, reduce overcrowding and help inmates successfully reintegrate into their communities.

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) – The FBI is provided $8.2 billion, which is $298 million above the enacted level and $44 million below the President’s budget request. Of that total, $450 million is provided to hire at least 140 new special agents and 45 new forensic accountants and analysts to investigate mortgage fraud, $79 million to address Internet crimes against children, child prostitution and domestic sex trafficking cases, and $182 million to protect our nation from cyber attacks.

U.S. Marshals Service – The U.S. Marshals Service is provided $1.2 billion, which is $17 million above the enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. This includes $61 million for enforcement of the Adam Walsh Act, which is $10 million above President’s budget request and will hire 50 new Deputy U.S. Marshals.

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) – The DEA is provided $2.1 billion, $77 million above the enacted level and equal to the President’s request, to help stop the flow of illegal drugs across the Southwest border and to investigate, disrupt and dismantle major Mexican drug cartels.

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) – ATF is provided $1.16 billion, which is $4.7 million above the enacted level and equal to the President’s request, to reduce violent crime and enforce Federal firearms and explosives laws. The total includes an additional $13 million and 37 positions to combat firearms trafficking along the Southwest border.

Crime Victims Fund (CVF) – The agreement permits the expenditure of $820 million from the CVF for grants to assist victims of crime. This is $115 million above the enacted level and $20 million above the President’s request.

Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) – The agreement provides $7 million for OSTP, equal to the budget request.

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) – The agreement provides $18.9 billion for NASA, $186 million above the Fiscal Year 2010 level and $90 million less than the President’s request. The total funding includes $989.1 million for base Space Shuttle operations; $2.7 billion for Space Station operations; $825 million for an additional Shuttle flight, if determined to be safe, and for launch infrastructure for the heavy lift rocket; $3 billion for development of the Orion multipurpose crew vehicle and the heavy lift launch vehicle; $5 billion for science; $580 million for aeronautics; and $559 million for space and exploration technology research.

National Science Foundation (NSF) – The agreement provides $7.34 billion for NSF, $418 million above the Fiscal Year 2010 enacted level. The total includes $5.9 billion for research, $157 million for research equipment and facilities, and $900 million for education activities.

National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) – The agreement provides $878 million for NIST, which is $21 million above the Fiscal Year 2010 level enacted level and $41 million below the President’s request. The agreement provides $70 million for the Technology Innovation Program (TIP), equal to the President’s request. The agreement also includes $125 million for the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Program.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) – The agreement provides more than $5.5 billion for NOAA, $805 million above the Fiscal Year 2010 level, not including supplemental funding, and $8.4 million above the President’s budget request. The agreement includes: $541 million for the National Ocean Service; $1.0 billion for the National Weather Service; $914 million for the National Marine Fisheries Service; $2.0 billion for satellite programs; and $456 million for Oceanic and Atmospheric research, including climate science.

Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) – The agreement continues the policy of providing PTO with full access to fees collected from inventors, estimated at $2.26 billion for Fiscal Year 2011, including the approval of a new 15% surcharge as requested by the President.

National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) – The agreement provides $62 million for NTIA, including $20 million for the Public Television Facilities Planning and Construction (PTFPC) grant program.

Provides $667.7 billion in new discretionary spending authority for the Department of Defense for functions under the Defense Subcommittee’s jurisdiction, including $157.8 billion for overseas contingency operations

Recommendation is $10.3 billion below the President’s FY 2011 base budget request

Provides $4 billion in General Transfer Authority

Title I – Military Personnel $126.4 billion. Funds an active duty end strength of 1,432,400 and a reserve component end strength of 846,200

Title II – Operation and Maintenance $165.8 billion. Fully funds key readiness programs critical to prepare forces for combat operations and other peace time missions: OPTEMPO flying hours and steaming days, depot maintenance, training, spare parts, and base operations

Provides $165 million above the request for tuition assistance for military spouses

Fully funds the request for the Department of Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund

Title III – Procurement $102.7 billion. Funds new equipment and upgrade programs to ensure that military forces have the platforms, weapon systems, and other equipment needed to support training, sustain the infrastructure and ensure readiness for military operations.

Fully funds Patriot missile program and provides an additional $133 million for Army unfunded requirements

Provides $205 million for the Israeli Iron Dome program

Research, Development, Test and Evaluation $955 million

Adds $112 million for Air Force Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance initiatives

Revolving and Management Funds $485 million

Includes $17 million in the Transportation Working Capital Fund for the transportation of fallen heroes.

Defense Health Programs $1.4 billion7

Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities $440 million

Office of the Inspector General $307 million

Overseas Deployments and Other Activities $157.7 billion

Provides $157.7 billion in new discretionary spending authority for the Department of Defense for functions under the Defense Subcommittee’s jurisdiction for overseas deployments and other activities

Military Personnel $ 16.8 billion

Operation and Maintenance $109.4 billion

Provides $11.6 billion for the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund to train and equip Afghan Security Forces

Provides $1.5 billion for the Iraq Security Forces Fund to train and equip the Iraq Security Forces

Provides $500 million for the Commander’s Emergency Response Program and caps projects at $20 million, realigning the program for its original purpose

Includes $400 million for the Afghanistan Infrastructure Fund, as requested by the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of State

Energy and Efficiency and Renewable Energy programs would receive $2.242 billion, the same as FY 2010.

Electricity and Energy Reliability would receive $172 million, the same as FY 2010.

Nuclear Energy would receive $775 million, which is $11 million below FY 2010.

Fossil Energy would receive $672 million, the same as FY2010.

The Strategic Petroleum Reserve would receive $209.9 million, an increase of $71 million above the request. The increase is the result of rejecting a rescission proposed by the Administration.

Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup would receive $244 million, the same as FY 2010.

The Office of Science would receive $4.904 billion, the same as FY 2010. The funding supports the creation of the new batteries and energy storage innovation HUB.

The Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) would receive $200 million to develop high-risk, but promising future energy technologies.

Weapons Activities would receive $7.008 billion, which is $624 million above FY 2010.

Nuclear Nonproliferation would receive $2.575 billion, which is $439 million above FY 2010.

Defense Environmental Cleanup would receive $5.260 billion

General Investigations would receive $150 million, which is $46 million above the budget request.

Construction funding would receive $1.824 billion, which is $134 million over the budget request.

The Mississippi River and Tributaries would receive $325 million, which is $85 million above the budget request.

Operations and Maintenance would receive $2.475 billion, which is $114 million above the budget request.

The Regulatory Program would receive $193 million equal to the request.

Formerly Utilized Sited Remedial Action Program would receive $130 million equal to the request.

The Office of the Assistant secretary of the Army for Civil Works would receive $6 million, which is the same as the request.

For General Expenses, the Corps would receive $187.4 million, which is $2.4 million above the request.

The Subcommittee legislation would provide $1.133 billion for the Department of the Interior. This level is $25 million above the President’s budget request.

The Department of Interior’s Central Utah Project Completion Account would receive $43 million, which is the equal to the budget request.

The Bureau of Reclamation’s Water and Related Resources account would receive $939 million, which is $25 million above the President’s budget request.

The Bureau of Reclamation’s Central Valley Project Restoration Fund account would receive $50 million, which is equal to the budget request.

The Bureau of Reclamation’s California Bay-Delta Restoration account would receive $40 million, which is equal to the budget request.

The Bureau of Reclamation’s Policy and Administration account would receive $61 million, which is equal to the President’s request.

IRS Business Systems Modernization (BSM) – $364.2 million ($23 million below budget request)

Tax Law Enforcement – $5.71 billion

Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI) – $277.4 million

Taxpayer Services – $2.338 billion

Commodity Futures Trading Commission: $286 million, which is +$117.2 million (69%) over FY10 enacted and +$25 million (9.5%) over the budget request ($261 million).

Consumer Product Safety Commission: $118.6 million, an increase of $0.4 million over FY10 and the same as the budget request, to monitor the safety of consumer products.

Federal Trade Commission: $316.5 million, $2.5 million above the President’s request and $24.8 million (8.5%) over the FY10 level.

General Services Administration: $492.7 million for construction and $500 million for repair of federal buildings and courthouses.

Securities and Exchange Commission: $1.3 billion, an increase of +$205 million (18%) over FY10 enacted ($1.118 billion) and $41.5 million (3%) over the request ($1.258 billion).

Small Business Administration: Total funding of $957 million for small business lending and outreach. Funding supports over $65 billion in small business lending, and also includes $22 million for microloan grants, $4 million to support $25 million in Microlending, and $115.25 million for Small Business Development Centers.

Coast Guard: $8.92 billion (excluding mandatory retirement funding), $142 million above FY 2010 and $200 million above the request. The bill includes $254 million for Coast Guard support of overseas contingency operations.

Transportation Security Administration (TSA): $5.63 billion in net discretionary spending, $375 million above FY 2010.

$2.95 billion for Transportation Security Officers, including funds for an additional 5,355 Transportation Security Officers to staff new Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) units;

$360 million for the procurement of checkpoint security technologies, including $192 million for additional AIT units; $39 million for 800 portable explosives trace detection units; and $6 million for the Airport Surveillance Program at checkpoints, which can be used for the purchase of security cameras for airport exit lanes;

$320 million in discretionary spending to purchase and install in-line explosives detection systems at airports for checked baggage. An additional $250 million is provided for this activity through mandatory fees;

$368 million for aviation regulation and enforcement, including $39 million to increase TSA’s international presence at high risk locations around the world and $69 million for 275 canine teams to strengthen explosives detection capabilities;

$120 million for air cargo security activities to ensure compliance with the 100 percent screening mandate, including $2.5 million above the request to target high risk international cargo;

$945 million for Federal Air Marshals, including an $85 million increase above FY 2010 to increase coverage on international flights in response to the December 25, 2009, failed terrorist attack on Northwest Flight 253, while restoring reductions to domestic coverage;

$138 million for surface transportation security, including funds to annualize 100 new inspectors and 15 Visible Intermodal Protective Response — “VIPR” — Teams added in FY 2010.

$978 million for Urban Area Security Initiative grants, a $91 million increase over the FY 2010 funding level and includes $19 million for non-profit security, $20 million for radiological and nuclear detection, and $18 million for National Special Security Events;

$950 million for State Homeland Security Grants, of which $60 million is for Operation
Stonegarden and $10 million is for the Citizen Corps Program;

$350 million for Rail/Transit/Bus Security Grants, a $38 million increase over the FY
2010 funding level, and includes $25 million for Amtrak;

$350 million for Port Security Grants, a $50 million increase over the FY 2010 funding
level;

$35 million for the Regional Catastrophic Grant Program;

$420 million for SAFER grants (firefighter hiring grants);

$420 million for FIRE grants (firefighter equipment grants), a $30 million increase over
the FY 2010 funding level;

$345 million for Emergency Management Performance Grants, a $5 million increase
over the FY 2010 level.

Customs and Border Protection (CBP): $9.96 billion, $147 million above the President’s request and $171 million below FY 2010. Funding within CBP for border security includes:

$3.58 billion to fully fund 20,500 Border Patrol agents, of whom over 17,000 will be
stationed on the Southwest Border – more than double the number of agents on board in
2004;

$15 million for intellectual property rights protection activities

$574 million for Southwest Border investments for Border Security Fencing, Infrastructure, and Technology (BSFIT), as requested. Through a mix of fencing, technology, and Border Patrol agents on the ground, CBP now has more than 700 miles of the Southwest border under effective control, compared to 241 miles in FY 2005.

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE): $5.59 billion, $69 million above the President’s request and $156 million above FY 2010, including:

$7 million above the request for ICE to expand the Visa Security Program to 3 additional
overseas locations to enhance our ability to prevent individuals wishing to do us harm from obtaining visas to travel to this country. Had such a unit been in place in Sana’a, Yemen, it likely would have prevented the December 25 bomber from obtaining a U.S. visa;

$3.5 million for investigations of intellectual property rights violations, and $2 million
above the request for ICE efforts to combat transnational criminal gang conspiracies;

$260 million for Secure Communities, $60 million above the request and the FY 2010
level;

Secret Service: $1.579 billion, $7 million above the request and $96 million above the FY 2010 level.

$271 million to continue building the Department of Homeland Security headquarters and
consolidate building leases scattered across the National Capital Region in 46 disparate
locations;

$162 million for the Chief Information Officer and DHS components to consolidate 24
legacy data centers into two secure locations;

$10 million above FY 2010 to increase acquisition oversight personnel across the
Department and a $7 million increase for the Office of Procurement;

$18 million to consolidate 13 separate DHS financial systems to improve internal controls
and financial reporting.

Provides $6.2 billion to support the ongoing operations of our national parks and forests, our national wildlife refuges and our federal rangelands;

Provides $506.8 million for the purchase and protection of lands through the Land and Water Conservation Fund;

Provides over $7 billion to help improve the quality and accessibility of education, health care and law enforcement programs for Native Americans and Alaska Natives;

Provides over $10 billion to protect human health and the environment to fund pollution control programs that provide cleaner air and water, regulation and disposal of hazardous waste and toxic substances.

$3.5 billion for water and sewer infrastructure and other infrastructure improvement activities, a decrease of $372 million below the FY 2010 enacted level. The bill will fund more than 1,000 water and sewer projects for communities nationwide and includes:

$1.9 billion for sewer system improvements through the Clean Water State Revolving Fund program;

$1.2 billion for drinking water system improvements through the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund program

$145 million above the President’s request for targeted water and sewer improvements.

$1.29 billion to States and tribes to fund environmental regulation and protection activities, an increase of $170 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and $10 million above the President’s request including:

$309 million for State and local air pollution control grants, an increase of $83 million over the 2010 level;

$274 million for State water pollution control grants, an increase of $45 million above the FY 2010 enacted level; and

$30 million for a new tribal grant program to implement pollution control activities in Indian Country.

$2.93 billion for environmental programs and management activities, a decrease of $66.8 million below the fiscal year 2010 enacted level. An amount of $454 million is provided for environmental protection programs focused on regional water bodies, including $300 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, $63 million for the Chesapeake Bay Program and $7 million to restore the San Francisco Bay.

$1.29 billion for Superfund programs and activities, a decrease of $13.5 million below the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s request.

$852 million for science and technology programs, an increase of $4 million above the fiscal year 2010 enacted level and $5 million above the President’s request. Within the funds provided, $3 million is included to expand environmental testing of subsea dispersants such as those used during the recent Deepwater Horizon incident.

$60 million for Diesel Emission

$4.4 billion for Indian Health Service programs, an increase of $354 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$81.8 million for the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, an increase of $2.6 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$76.3 million for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, a decrease of $0.5 million below the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$3.45 million for the Council on Environmental Quality, an increase of $0.3 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$13.1 million for the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and $2.3 million over the President’s FY 2011 request.

$8 million for the Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation, the same amount as the FY 2010 enacted level and the President’s FY 2011 request.

$8.8 million for the Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts Development, an increase of $0.5 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$797.6 million for the Smithsonian Institution, an increase of $36.2 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$164.6 million for the National Gallery of Art, a decrease of $2.5 million from the FY 2010 enacted level and an increase of $1.8 million above the President’s FY 2011 request.

$37.4 million for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, a decrease of $3 million from the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$12.2 million for the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the same amount as the FY 2010 enacted level and $2.3 million above the President’s FY 2011 request.

$170 million for the National Endowment for the Arts, an increase of $2.5 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and $8.7 million above the President’s FY 2011 request.

$170 million for the National Endowment for the Arts, an increase of $2.5 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and $8.7 million above the President’s FY 2011 request.

$2.4 million for the Commission of Fine Arts, an increase of $0.06 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$12 million for the National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program, an increase of $2.5 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and $7.5 million above the President’s FY 2011 request.

$5.9 million for the Advisory Council on History Preservation, the same amount as the FY 2010 enacted level and President’s FY 2011 request.

$9.1 million for the National Capital Planning Commission, an increase of $0.6 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$50.5 million for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, an increase of $1.4 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and the same amount as the President’s FY 2011 request.

$21.6 million for the Presidio Trust, an increase of $1.6 million above the FY 2010 enacted level and $6.6 million above the President’s FY 2011 request.

$2.8 billion for the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG)

$8.1 billion for Head Start, an increase of $840 million over last year.

$852.4 million, an increase of $33 million, for local programs that provide congregate and home-delivered meals to seniors.

It increases funding for the education of homeless children and youth by $4.6 million, for a total of $70 million; includes $159.4 million, an increase of $17 million, for substance abuse and mental health services targeting the homeless; and provides $125.7 million, an increase of $10 million, for runaway and homeless youth programs.

$65 million, an increase of $5 million, to conduct eligibility reviews of claimants of unemployment insurance [UI].

$796 million for Social Security Administration program integrity activities, a $38 million increase over fiscal year 2010.

$471 million for Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control activities at the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This amount is a $160 million increase over the fiscal year 2010 level of $311 million.

$326 million, an increase of $21 million, for the inspectors general at the three Departments, the Corporation for National and Community Service, and the Social Security Administration to conduct additional audits and investigations of possible waste and fraud in government programs.

$217 million for Workforce Innovation Funds that will reform the Nation’s workforce investment system by improving the delivery of education and training programs to workers.

$300 million for a new Early Learning Challenge Fund that will provide competitive grants to States to raise the bar for early childhood programs.

$564.8 million public health initiative to prevent and reduce obesity-related chronic disease. The initiative includes: $209 million for community-based programs, $250 million for State planning and policy change, $49 million for national research and surveillance, and $56.8 million for the CDC to develop new models, evaluate current activities and produce cutting edge-science.

$550 million for the administration’s signature education reform program.

$224 million to replicate programs that have high levels of effectiveness as established under rigorous research and to develop and test promising new ideas.

$5 million for a new authorization that supports the creation of collaborative care networks.

$11.8 billion under section 611of IDEA Part B grants to States for educating students with disabilities. This amount is $290 million more than the fiscal year 2010 level.

$1.3 billion for the Corporation for National and Community Service. This level is $156.6 million above the fiscal year 2010 level.

$12.3 billion for the administrative expenses of the Social Security Administration (SSA), an increase of $882 million over last year.

Senate – $926 million – the same as FY10 and $116 million below the request. Funds all Senate offices, the Senate Sergeant at Arms, the Secretary of the Senate, and the other agencies that support the operation of the Senate at current year levels.

House – $1.371 billion – $2 million over FY10 and $47.8 million below the request. Provides the House of Representatives additional funds sufficient to replace critical life and safety equipment for the House Buildings and the House side of the Capitol.

Architect of the Capitol – $581.6 million – $20 million below FY10 and $173 million below the request. This includes $117 million in capital projects to address deferred maintenance, fire and life safety deficiencies and capital renewal. In addition, the Committee authorized the use of over $23.6 million in prior year balances to complete critical projects requested in FY11.

Capitol Police – $337.2 million, – $18.1 million below FY10 and $37.7 million below the request. Fully funds onboard strength of 1800 Capitol Police officers and 393 civilians. Additional $13 million was included in FY10 supplemental for completion of radio modernization project.

Government Accountability Office – $558.4 million – $1.6 million above current year and $42.6 million below the request. Additional funds provided for GAO’s expanded role in auditing the Federal Reserve. Also provides an increase of $4.2 million in offsetting collections.

Library of Congress – $643 million – same as FY10; $31.4 million below request. Includes $437 million for salaries and expenses; $21.6 million for Copyright Office; $114.3 million for the Congressional Research Service; and $70.5 million for Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped.

Government Printing Office – $147 million – same as current year and $19 million below the request. Provides $8 million for GPO to continue development of its Federal Digital System and other technology upgrades.

Congressional Budget Office – $46.9 million – $1.7 million over FY10 and $384,000 below the request. Fully supports current onboard staffing levels.

Office of Compliance – $4.4 million – same as current year and $299,000 below the request.

$13.8 billion to fund military construction projects worldwide, including operational, training, and research facilities, readiness centers, barracks, schools, hospitals, and clinics.

$1.8 billion as requested for family housing construction, privatization, and operating costs.

$2.35 billion for BRAC 2005 as requested and $450 million for BRAC 1990, $90 million over the request.

$258.8 million as requested to fund the U.S. share of joint U.S.-NATO military facilities.

$253 million, $133 million above the request, including $10 million for planning and design, to accelerate the Defense Department’s efforts to improve energy efficiency and reduce greenhouse gas production on military installations.

$250 million as requested for medical care, including telehealth and mobile clinics, for veterans in rural and highly rural areas, including Native American populations.

$20 million above the request for the VA to establish additional Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs), of which $10 million is designated for the establishment of additional clinics in areas currently underserved by VA health care facilities.

$10 million over the request for the VA to establish new vet centers across the country, with special emphasis on opening vet centers on reservations, many of which are remote from VA facilities.

$4.2 billion for health care and support services for homeless veterans. This includes $799.2 million in direct programs to assist homeless veterans, including $151 million for the HUD-VASH program, $217 million for the Homeless Grant Per Diem Program and Program Liaisons; and, $12.6 million for the Veterans Justice Outreach program.

$2.6 billion as requested to meet the health care needs of veterans who have served in Iraq and Afghanistan, a $597 million increase over last year.

$100.2 million for implementation of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010.

$217.6 million as requested to meet the unique needs of women veterans.

$590 million as requested, an increase of $9 million over the 2010 funding level, for research in a number of areas

$6.8 billion for long term care for the Nation’s aging veterans as well as severely wounded combat veterans from the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

$1.1 billion for the VA to address critical non-recurring maintenance and the backlog of code violations at existing VA hospitals and clinics.

$3.16 billion for IT projects ($144.5 million below the request) to develop electronic health care records, paperless claims systems, and seamless integration of medical and service records with the Department of Defense.

$474 million above the fiscal year 2010 level for VBA’s operating expenses.

$115.4 million for the IG’s office.

$87.4 million, $3 million above the request to support the expansion of ABMC’s interpretive program and for non-recurring maintenance needs.

$28.3 million, $61.8 million below the request. The bill defers funding for the construction of a new courthouse due to unresolved cost and site issues.

$50.3 million, $12.2 million above the request. The additional funding is provided for the hiring of new employees, digitizing records, security upgrades, and development of a master plan to address severe management deficiencies reported last summer by the Secretary of the Army

$71.2 million as requested for operations and maintenance.

$1.25 billion in emergency funds for military construction projects in support of overseas contingency operations, primarily in Afghanistan.

Diplomatic and Consular Programs (D&CP). The bill provides $9.55 billion

Worldwide Security Protection. The bill provides $1.56 billion for Worldwide Security Protection for non-capital security upgrades, the same as the request. This account funds Diplomatic Security agents, armored vehicles, and training

Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs (ECE). The bill provides $654.2 million

Civilian Stabilization Initiative (CSI). The bill provides $35 million for the Department of State’s CSI and $15 million for USAID’s CSI account

Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities (CIPA). The bill provides $2.09 billion for CIPA, a decrease of $85.9 million below the below the President’s request, and $55.9 million is transferred to the “Peacekeeping Operations”

Contributions to International Organizations (CIO). The bill provides $1.54 billion for CIO, which is $50 million below the President’s request.

Broadcasting Board of Governors (BBG). The bill provides $751.37 million for the BBG, which is $17.40 million below the request and $4.96 million above the FY10 enacted level.

Development Assistance (DA). The bill provides $2.76 billion

International Disaster Assistance (IDA). The bill provides $851 million

Economic Support Fund (ESF). The bill provides $6.79 billion

Assistance for Europe, Eurasia and Central Asia (AEECA). The bill provides $709 million

Democracy Fund (DF). The bill provides $115 million

Migration and Refugee Assistance (MRA). The bill provides $1.68 billion for Migration and Refugee Assistance, which is $79.6 million above the request and equal to the FY10 level.

Peace Corps. The bill provides $425 million, which $25 million

Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC). The bill provides $1.10 billion

Afghanistan. The bill provides a total of $911.1 million for State Department operations

Pakistan. The bill provides a total of $1.53 billion for State Department operations

Iraq. The bill provides a total of $1.761 billion for State Department operations

$500 million for grants to support significant transportation projects in a wide variety of modes, including highways and bridges, public transportation, passenger and freight railroads, and port infrastructure. The funding requires the Secretary to allocate no less than $100 million for projects in rural communities.

$1 billion for investments in intercity and high speed rail grants. This funding will build on the $10.5 billion already provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and fiscal year 2010 Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill. 2

$669 million in funding above the budget request is provided for the Federal-Aid Highway program.

$1.85 billion for the transit “New Starts” program. This funding supports projects across the Nation that will provide new or expanded public transportation services.

$3.5 billion for capital investments at airports across the country.

$2.5 billion for the public housing capital fund

$9.3 billion for the project-based section 8 program, including over $9 billion for the renewal of all expiring project-based contracts for a full 12 months.

$2.2 billion for homeless assistance grants.

$825 million for housing for our nation’s low-income elderly.

$235 million for housing for our Nation’s disabled.

$345 million to increase housing assistance for persons living with HIV/AIDS.

$700 million for Native American housing block grants.

$3.99 billion for CDBG grants for States and communities across the Nation

$1.825 billion for the HOME Investment Partnership program, which is equal to the level of funding provided in fiscal year 2010 and $175 million above the Presid

$35 million is provided for additional capital grants for the NeighborWorks organization to develop and finance affordable housing projects in communities across the country, especially in rural communities.

$213 million for housing counseling. This includes $88 million for HUD’s housing counseling activities, including foreclosure prevention and pre-purchase counseling.

$3 million for the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation to continue its mortgage rescue scam public education and outreach campaign.

$23 million to research the causes of sudden unintended acceleration and identify ways to improve vehicle crash worthiness.

$20 million to expand the safety workforce responsible for administering permits for the transportation of hazardous materials and to conduct research into pipeline inspection technology.

$75 million for grants to invest in railroad safety technology, including positive train control.
$11 million more than the budget request to hire additional aviation safety inspectors.

$150 million is provided for grants to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) for capital investments.

$100 million split evenly between the Federal Transit and Highway Administrations to help transportation planning agencies improve their models and better coordinate transportation and housing forecasts.

$150 million within HUD’s Community Development Fund to promote integrated housing and transportation planning.

$200 million for the HOPE VI program, including $90 million for HUD’s Choice Neighborhoods Initiative (CNI).

$65 million for grants to help transit agencies make cutting-edge and innovative capital investments that will reduce the energy consumption or greenhouse gas emissions of their operations.

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